Demonground

My thoughts, the Psychic stuff and life here in Austin Texas on a daily basis as I come to see it.


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Reblogged from tumblinwithhotties

tumblinwithhotties:

The Language of Love 

"I googled how to tell a guy you like him, but all the results are about how much makeup to use."

"I have to take the plunge.  Open my mouth and tell that beautiful boy how I feel.”

17 year old Charlie struggles to find the words to be true to himself…and his best friend. A wry, delicate take on first love and awakening sexuality from a young man’s perspective.  The fear of realization and the unknown.

Little over 9 minutes, No nudity, minor harsh language.

I did not want this short to end…I want more!  Really wonderful film.

Kim Ho, the student in the film, not only performed the part…he wrote the film.  (more great gay-themed short films)

Reblogged from compoundchem
jtotheizzoe:

compoundchem:

With autumn on the horizon, this graphic looks at the chemicals behind the myriad colours of autumn leaves; bigger version & download here: http://wp.me/p4aPLT-sn

Apparently there are places in the world where this is starting to happen? I wouldn’t know since Austin still has the summer dial turned up to like 8.5, and our trees don’t so much “change color” as “exhaustedly whither into a brown winter dormancy as if finally exhaling after the release of soul-crushing weight.”
This color-changing thing sounds nice though, I hope to check it out sometime!
PS - “Autumnal carotenoids” would make a great indie band name.

jtotheizzoe:

compoundchem:

With autumn on the horizon, this graphic looks at the chemicals behind the myriad colours of autumn leaves; bigger version & download here: http://wp.me/p4aPLT-sn

Apparently there are places in the world where this is starting to happen? I wouldn’t know since Austin still has the summer dial turned up to like 8.5, and our trees don’t so much “change color” as “exhaustedly whither into a brown winter dormancy as if finally exhaling after the release of soul-crushing weight.”

This color-changing thing sounds nice though, I hope to check it out sometime!

PS - “Autumnal carotenoids” would make a great indie band name.

(via mycology-and-movies-oh-my)

Reblogged from ahsfanatic

I love this series.

Its Jessica Langes last season

(Source: ahsfanatic, via cub-buns)

Reblogged from wild-guy

jtotheizzoe:

endangereduglythings:

wild-guy:

Achrioptera fallax (x)

That coloration is waaay too cool to not reblog. Those are colors I’d expect in a children’s cartoon, not in real life.

Of course this thing is from Madagascar, the island where evolution took LSD. I mean, more like Rad-agascar, amirite?

In all seriousness, Madagascar is a perfect example of the incredible diversity that results from evolution in isolation thanks to about 90 million years of being separated from the African continent. Find out more about where Madagascar’s species came from here.

See those flower-petal-esque wings? While they’re useless for flight, they do make some pretty cool predator-avoidance noises. Check out the video below to hear ‘em:

Btw, are you following endangereduglythings? Freaky fauna can (and often are) just as endangered or threatened as the cute kind. We should celebrate and protect nature’s oddities just as much as its supermodels!

(via mycology-and-movies-oh-my)

Reblogged from milestellers

thatcurlyhurdgirl:

I will reblog this everyday

(Source: milestellers, via mycology-and-movies-oh-my)

Reblogged from everydaysagreatday

everydaysagreatday:

Well I didn’t see this coming… :D

Gotta Love it!!

(via menbulgesbuttssports)

Reblogged from ihaveaprestigiousblog
Reblogged from mycology
mycology:

Organic Mushroom Farming and Mycoremediation Simple to Advanced and Experimental Techniques for Indoor and Outdoor Cultivation by Tradd Cotter
"With innovative new methods for urban and off-grid growing, making mushroom-infused beers, morel cultivation, and more
What would it take to grow mushrooms in space? How can mushroom cultivation help us manage, or at least make use of, invasive species and thereby reduce dependence on herbicides? Is it possible to develop a low-cost and easy-to-implement mushroom-growing kit that would provide high-quality edible protein and bioremediation in the wake of a natural disaster? How can we advance our understanding of morel cultivation so that growers stand a better chance of success?
For more than twenty years, mycologist Tradd Cotter has been pondering these questions and researching for answers. In Organic Mushroom Farming and Mycoremediation, Cotter offers readers an in-depth exploration of best organic mushroom cultivation practices, for both indoor and outdoor growing of a wide variety of species. He also shares insight into his groundbreaking research on challenges such as cultivating morels, “training” mycelium to respond to specific contaminants, and perpetuating spawn on cardboard without the use of electricity.
For those who aspire to the self-sufficiency gained by generating and expanding spawn rather than purchasing it, Cotter covers lab techniques, including low-cost alternatives that make use of existing infrastructure and materials. Readers will also discover information on making tinctures, powders, and mushroom-infused honey; making an antibacterial mushroom cutting board; and growing mushrooms on old denim jeans.
More than a cultivation guide, Organic Mushroom Farming and Mycoremediation is about healing the people and the planet, one mushroom and one cultivator at a time, reversing destructive cycles into creative forces. Cotter urges readers to think with an opportunistic yet minimalistic approach, much like a mushroom, taking what it needs to survive and then returning resources to its ecosystem.
Geared toward readers who want to grow mushrooms without the use of pesticides, Cotter takes “organic” one step further by introducing an entirely new way of thinking—one that looks at the potential to grow mushrooms on just about anything, just about anywhere, and by anyone.”

mycology:

Organic Mushroom Farming and Mycoremediation Simple to Advanced and Experimental Techniques for Indoor and Outdoor Cultivation by Tradd Cotter

"With innovative new methods for urban and off-grid growing, making mushroom-infused beers, morel cultivation, and more

What would it take to grow mushrooms in space? How can mushroom cultivation help us manage, or at least make use of, invasive species and thereby reduce dependence on herbicides? Is it possible to develop a low-cost and easy-to-implement mushroom-growing kit that would provide high-quality edible protein and bioremediation in the wake of a natural disaster? How can we advance our understanding of morel cultivation so that growers stand a better chance of success?

For more than twenty years, mycologist Tradd Cotter has been pondering these questions and researching for answers. In Organic Mushroom Farming and Mycoremediation, Cotter offers readers an in-depth exploration of best organic mushroom cultivation practices, for both indoor and outdoor growing of a wide variety of species. He also shares insight into his groundbreaking research on challenges such as cultivating morels, “training” mycelium to respond to specific contaminants, and perpetuating spawn on cardboard without the use of electricity.

For those who aspire to the self-sufficiency gained by generating and expanding spawn rather than purchasing it, Cotter covers lab techniques, including low-cost alternatives that make use of existing infrastructure and materials. Readers will also discover information on making tinctures, powders, and mushroom-infused honey; making an antibacterial mushroom cutting board; and growing mushrooms on old denim jeans.

More than a cultivation guide, Organic Mushroom Farming and Mycoremediation is about healing the people and the planet, one mushroom and one cultivator at a time, reversing destructive cycles into creative forces. Cotter urges readers to think with an opportunistic yet minimalistic approach, much like a mushroom, taking what it needs to survive and then returning resources to its ecosystem.

Geared toward readers who want to grow mushrooms without the use of pesticides, Cotter takes “organic” one step further by introducing an entirely new way of thinking—one that looks at the potential to grow mushrooms on just about anything, just about anywhere, and by anyone.”

Reblogged from monets

blakyokojones:

Idris

I love this man.

(Source: monets)

Reblogged from tabbylane

cuntology:

yes

Gotta Love it!

(Source: tabbylane, via tumblinwithhotties)